Plot Bunnies' Writing

Extracts, Book Reviews, etc

Between Teas and Ticking

    Evelyn could never trust her ears. For a moment, the ticking sounds like
home. It bounces her back into her kitchen and the chilli-shaped clock above the
door. A gift from her sister, Vivian. The matching kettle whistles for her to take it off
the heat. She pours, orange-scented steam rising into her face like a sauna. She lets
the tea steep as she wipes the counter, preparing her mind for the part of the
evening she dreads. She has a final finger-burning squeeze of the tea bag and
chucks it at the bin, rather disappointed that it lands on the floor next to it with a plop.
No matter. She will put it where it was headed tomorrow. She takes her tea and flicks
the light off.

'Renegade' by James Lambert

This is a mini story written by James Lambert, age 13, a friend of Brighton Plot Bunnies.

Slow Dance

I don’t feel comfortable in this dress. My friends forced me into it after they saw the floaty summer dress I had been planning to wear, but my chest feels constricted and I’m pretty sure if I bend over my knickers will be on display. They wanted me to go commando, but I have my limits.

Six Shooter

This is one of a series. You can find the continuing adventures of Benton and Seth at bentonandseth.wordpress.com

A short short

This is a short, standalone scene.
---

    Since the accident there had been nothing but an endless stream of forms, coming at her in every size and colour. All to be neatly done and filled in triplicate and each needing to be completed before she could even begin to think about the next.

Etch-a-Sketch

This is the beginning of a novel.
---

    When I was seven, my favourite plaything was a magic drawing board. For the other kids in my small suburban infants school, the toy to die for was the Etch-a-Sketch. It later featured with its classic strawberry red case in the supporting cast of Toy Story. But I hated its crude jagged lines. It didn’t matter how carefully you worked the knobs on each side in an effort to draw a diagonal or a curve, the result was always ugly. The Etch-a-Sketch was no more than a status symbol, created by and for mechanistic minds. It was limited in its scope and predictable, much like most of the kids in my class.

A Journey

February's writing challenge was: A journey. This was my effort.
---

    I have been on this train for thirteen hours. The tedium is unrelenting.
    The couple sitting opposite me are wrapped in each other’s arms, oblivious to everything else except him, her. Nothing to bother them like it’s bothering me. Good for them.

'Into the End' by Jeremy Vaeni

Jeremy Vaeni does not have a Wikipedia page, so I can’t do my usual introductory thing of pointing at it and summarising the more interesting bits. He’s an obscure figure, clearly, who does not merit a page on Wikipedia; he’s just not important enough. Who the fuck is this guy, and what am I doing reading his book?

'Broken Monsters' by Lauren Beukes

I followed the publishing progress of Lauren Beukes’s Broken Monsters on Twitter, and when it was finally released in the UK on the 31st of July, I didn’t buy it straightaway. I actually waited until the 12th of August because that was the day Lauren was to be in London, signing copies in Forbidden Planet on Shaftesbury Avenue. We’ve tweeted, Lauren and I, and have been in touch mainly via this website, for which she kindly answered all our silly questions for our Q&A, which you can read by clicking here.

'Broken Monsters' by Lauren Beukes

I followed the publishing progress of Lauren Beukes’s Broken Monsters on Twitter, and when it was finally released in the UK on the 31st of July, I didn’t buy it straightaway. I actually waited until the 12th of August because that was the day Lauren was to be in London, signing copies in Forbidden Planet on Shaftesbury Avenue. We’ve tweeted, Lauren and I, and have been in touch mainly via this website, for which she kindly answered all our silly questions for our Q&A, which you can read by clicking here.

'The Gospel of Loki' by Joanne M. Harris

Joanne’s Loki, as you would expect from a writer of her calibre, is an interesting and easy read. I can’t tell you how many books I’ve started and abandoned recently, but I read Loki straight through.

So it’s a good read. If you’ve never heard of Loki, or even if you have, but don’t know the myths about him, then this is highly recommended.

'The Gospel of Loki' by Joanne M. Harris

Joanne’s Loki, as you would expect from a writer of her calibre, is an interesting and easy read. I can’t tell you how many books I’ve started and abandoned recently, but I read Loki straight through.

So it’s a good read. If you’ve never heard of Loki, or even if you have, but don’t know the myths about him, then this is highly recommended.

'The Name of the Wind' by Patrick Rothfuss

“The Waystone was his, just as the third silence was his. This was appropriate, as it was the greatest silence of the three, wrapping the others inside itself. It was deep and wide as autumn’s ending. It was heavy as a great river-smooth stone. It was the patient, cut-flower sound of a man who is waiting to die.”

The Name of the Wind, first in the Kingkiller Chronicles, was one of those books I'd seen around, figured I'd probably enjoy and so fully intended to put it on my 'to read' list at some point, but had no particular plans to read any time soon. However, then my Taller Half got hold of it and would not stop badgering me until I agreed to bump it to the top of the list. This in itself is a fairly good endorsement of the book since Taller Half isn't anywhere near the same sort of reader as me. He likes books well enough but he is considerably more picky than me about what he enjoys in a story and he has never, in the six plus years we've been together, spoken about a book the way he did about The Name of the Wind.

'The Name of the Wind' by Patrick Rothfuss

“The Waystone was his, just as the third silence was his. This was appropriate, as it was the greatest silence of the three, wrapping the others inside itself. It was deep and wide as autumn’s ending. It was heavy as a great river-smooth stone. It was the patient, cut-flower sound of a man who is waiting to die.”

The Name of the Wind, first in the Kingkiller Chronicles, was one of those books I'd seen around, figured I'd probably enjoy and so fully intended to put it on my 'to read' list at some point, but had no particular plans to read any time soon. However, then my Taller Half got hold of it and would not stop badgering me until I agreed to bump it to the top of the list. This in itself is a fairly good endorsement of the book since Taller Half isn't anywhere near the same sort of reader as me. He likes books well enough but he is considerably more picky than me about what he enjoys in a story and he has never, in the six plus years we've been together, spoken about a book the way he did about The Name of the Wind.

‘The Female Man’ by Joanna Russ

I had never heard of Joanna Russ until I picked up this book in the library. Here’s some info extracted from her Wikipedia entry (I have edited a bit):

‘The Female Man’ by Joanna Russ

I had never heard of Joanna Russ until I picked up this book in the library. Here’s some info extracted from her Wikipedia entry (I have edited a bit):

'Hawthorn and Child' by Keith Ridgway

This is a weird one for me to write. Partly, it’s weird writing this because I gave up reading it halfway through, which almost never happens. Because of its rarity, it’s also noteworthy, and this is why I feel I ought to write this review.

Pages

Published

Charlie has an ongoing project where he posts much of his writings, here. Charlie is probably our most prolific writer and has been the Municipal Liaison for the Brighton NaNoWriMo group for a few years running.

Emma has had a story published on the Diabolical Plots website, here. This story was born of a conversation about weddings and is typical of the sort of thing we talk about at meetings.

Dawn and Laz have an ongoing joint (huge) science fiction project and their website is full of snippets, bits and pieces, timelines, character profiles and sketches, as well as several short stories. It can be found here.

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bookworm_chic's blog

Member bookworm_chic has a blog called Narration Sidetracks, please have a look around and let her know what you think.

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WikiRiffs at Wattpad

WikiRiffs, aka Jonny, uses Wattpad to showcase some of his writing. You can get to it by clicking this link, and you will find poetry and shorts, which Jonny adds to regularly.

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Blogs

black_faerie has a blog here, which she updates (reasonably) frequently. Sometimes it's about kung fu, much of the time it's about writing (either her own or other people's) and sometimes it's just rambling.

Do feel free to read and comment on any of the entries, and please keep things friendly.

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