Plot Bunnies' Writing

Extracts, Book Reviews, etc

Between Teas and Ticking

    Evelyn could never trust her ears. For a moment, the ticking sounds like
home. It bounces her back into her kitchen and the chilli-shaped clock above the
door. A gift from her sister, Vivian. The matching kettle whistles for her to take it off
the heat. She pours, orange-scented steam rising into her face like a sauna. She lets
the tea steep as she wipes the counter, preparing her mind for the part of the
evening she dreads. She has a final finger-burning squeeze of the tea bag and
chucks it at the bin, rather disappointed that it lands on the floor next to it with a plop.
No matter. She will put it where it was headed tomorrow. She takes her tea and flicks
the light off.

'Renegade' by James Lambert

This is a mini story written by James Lambert, age 13, a friend of Brighton Plot Bunnies.

Slow Dance

I don’t feel comfortable in this dress. My friends forced me into it after they saw the floaty summer dress I had been planning to wear, but my chest feels constricted and I’m pretty sure if I bend over my knickers will be on display. They wanted me to go commando, but I have my limits.

Six Shooter

This is one of a series. You can find the continuing adventures of Benton and Seth at bentonandseth.wordpress.com

A short short

This is a short, standalone scene.
---

    Since the accident there had been nothing but an endless stream of forms, coming at her in every size and colour. All to be neatly done and filled in triplicate and each needing to be completed before she could even begin to think about the next.

Etch-a-Sketch

This is the beginning of a novel.
---

    When I was seven, my favourite plaything was a magic drawing board. For the other kids in my small suburban infants school, the toy to die for was the Etch-a-Sketch. It later featured with its classic strawberry red case in the supporting cast of Toy Story. But I hated its crude jagged lines. It didn’t matter how carefully you worked the knobs on each side in an effort to draw a diagonal or a curve, the result was always ugly. The Etch-a-Sketch was no more than a status symbol, created by and for mechanistic minds. It was limited in its scope and predictable, much like most of the kids in my class.

A Journey

February's writing challenge was: A journey. This was my effort.
---

    I have been on this train for thirteen hours. The tedium is unrelenting.
    The couple sitting opposite me are wrapped in each other’s arms, oblivious to everything else except him, her. Nothing to bother them like it’s bothering me. Good for them.

A Pocketful of Crows by Joanne M Harris

It isn’t often these days that not only do I feel compelled to immediately review the book I’ve just read, but the need to spew words out right now is so powerful that I can’t ignore it. Joanne Harris’s latest novella A Pocketful of Crows is the first book I’ve read in a single sitting for a long while. Often I’ve read them in two, or perhaps three sittings - but one is very rare. (The last one I read in one sitting was Brian and Wendy Froud’s Trolls, but that’s more a story book than a novel, and it’s short - but it socked me in the gut for similar reasons.

A Pocketful of Crows by Joanne M Harris

It isn’t often these days that not only do I feel compelled to immediately review the book I’ve just read, but the need to spew words out right now is so powerful that I can’t ignore it. Joanne Harris’s latest novella A Pocketful of Crows is the first book I’ve read in a single sitting for a long while. Often I’ve read them in two, or perhaps three sittings - but one is very rare. (The last one I read in one sitting was Brian and Wendy Froud’s Trolls, but that’s more a story book than a novel, and it’s short - but it socked me in the gut for similar reasons.

'The Death House' by Sarah Pinborough

“They say it makes your eyes bleed. Almost pop out of your head and then bleed.”

This is the first line of The Death House. Cleverly, Sarah Pinborough has forced you to wonder what “it” is and why it makes your eyes bleed, and who is saying it. It’s every writer’s dream and every writer’s curse: get the first page, paragraph, hell, get the first sentence just right, so readers will want to know more.

'The Death House' by Sarah Pinborough

“They say it makes your eyes bleed. Almost pop out of your head and then bleed.”

This is the first line of The Death House. Cleverly, Sarah Pinborough has forced you to wonder what “it” is and why it makes your eyes bleed, and who is saying it. It’s every writer’s dream and every writer’s curse: get the first page, paragraph, hell, get the first sentence just right, so readers will want to know more.

'Birdy' by Jess Vallance

"Do you know, I met a family in Brazil who called every one of their children Frances. Two girls, and then Francis with an i for the three boys. 'It's our favourite name,' the parents said when we asked about it. That was all there was to it as far as they were concerned. How brilliant is that?"

'Throw Away Your Loincloth' by Michelle Jones

I haven’t really known how to start reviewing this book. I read it because I met the writer at an event at the bookshop where she’s the manager, Waterstone’s in Chichester (I refuse to delete the very necessary apostrophe), and we got talking (as you do - well, as I do, anyway). So she gave me a copy of the book and I promised to read and review it.

'Throw Away Your Loincloth' by Michelle Jones

I haven’t really known how to start reviewing this book. I read it because I met the writer at an event at the bookshop where she’s the manager, Waterstone’s in Chichester (I refuse to delete the very necessary apostrophe), and we got talking (as you do - well, as I do, anyway). So she gave me a copy of the book and I promised to read and review it.

'Labyrinth' by Kate Mosse

Perhaps I’ve been spoilt, reading so many books throughout my life that anything less than wow is just, well… meh. Or perhaps it isn’t that at all. Maybe the fact of being a writer myself means I pick novels apart, finding even minor faults in certain passages that make me think, ‘That sentence would be better if…’ or, ‘But that doesn’t make any sense!’ I don’t always do that, though it’s happening more and more all the time. Mostly, I read like a reader, not like a writer. Unless a novel is especially bad or especially good, I read and enjoy and then move on to the next one.

'Labyrinth' by Kate Mosse

Perhaps I’ve been spoilt, reading so many books throughout my life that anything less than wow is just, well… meh. Or perhaps it isn’t that at all. Maybe the fact of being a writer myself means I pick novels apart, finding even minor faults in certain passages that make me think, ‘That sentence would be better if…’ or, ‘But that doesn’t make any sense!’ I don’t always do that, though it’s happening more and more all the time. Mostly, I read like a reader, not like a writer. Unless a novel is especially bad or especially good, I read and enjoy and then move on to the next one.

'Into the End' by Jeremy Vaeni

Jeremy Vaeni does not have a Wikipedia page, so I can’t do my usual introductory thing of pointing at it and summarising the more interesting bits. He’s an obscure figure, clearly, who does not merit a page on Wikipedia; he’s just not important enough. Who the fuck is this guy, and what am I doing reading his book?

Pages

Published

Charlie has an ongoing project where he posts much of his writings, here. Charlie is probably our most prolific writer and has been the Municipal Liaison for the Brighton NaNoWriMo group for a few years running.

Emma has had a story published on the Diabolical Plots website, here. This story was born of a conversation about weddings and is typical of the sort of thing we talk about at meetings.

Dawn and Laz have an ongoing joint (huge) science fiction project and their website is full of snippets, bits and pieces, timelines, character profiles and sketches, as well as several short stories. It can be found here.

Tags:

bookworm_chic's blog

Member bookworm_chic has a blog called Narration Sidetracks, please have a look around and let her know what you think.

Tags:

WikiRiffs at Wattpad

WikiRiffs, aka Jonny, uses Wattpad to showcase some of his writing. You can get to it by clicking this link, and you will find poetry and shorts, which Jonny adds to regularly.

Tags:

Blogs

black_faerie has a blog here, which she updates (reasonably) frequently. Sometimes it's about kung fu, much of the time it's about writing (either her own or other people's) and sometimes it's just rambling.

Do feel free to read and comment on any of the entries, and please keep things friendly.

Tags: