Other Writers

Book Reviews, Author Interviews and more

Q&A with Joanne Harris

First of all, we must thank Joanne for agreeing to this insanity.

Joanne Harris is the acclaimed writer of Chocolat. The sequel is called The Lollipop Shoes and she has just submitted Peaches For Monsieur Le Curé, the third novel featuring some of the same characters from both and which is due for publication at the end of May 2012.

Pages

'Into the End' by Jeremy Vaeni

Jeremy Vaeni does not have a Wikipedia page, so I can’t do my usual introductory thing of pointing at it and summarising the more interesting bits. He’s an obscure figure, clearly, who does not merit a page on Wikipedia; he’s just not important enough. Who the fuck is this guy, and what am I doing reading his book?

'Broken Monsters' by Lauren Beukes

I followed the publishing progress of Lauren Beukes’s Broken Monsters on Twitter, and when it was finally released in the UK on the 31st of July, I didn’t buy it straightaway. I actually waited until the 12th of August because that was the day Lauren was to be in London, signing copies in Forbidden Planet on Shaftesbury Avenue. We’ve tweeted, Lauren and I, and have been in touch mainly via this website, for which she kindly answered all our silly questions for our Q&A, which you can read by clicking here.

'Broken Monsters' by Lauren Beukes

I followed the publishing progress of Lauren Beukes’s Broken Monsters on Twitter, and when it was finally released in the UK on the 31st of July, I didn’t buy it straightaway. I actually waited until the 12th of August because that was the day Lauren was to be in London, signing copies in Forbidden Planet on Shaftesbury Avenue. We’ve tweeted, Lauren and I, and have been in touch mainly via this website, for which she kindly answered all our silly questions for our Q&A, which you can read by clicking here.

'The Gospel of Loki' by Joanne M. Harris

Joanne’s Loki, as you would expect from a writer of her calibre, is an interesting and easy read. I can’t tell you how many books I’ve started and abandoned recently, but I read Loki straight through.

So it’s a good read. If you’ve never heard of Loki, or even if you have, but don’t know the myths about him, then this is highly recommended.

'The Gospel of Loki' by Joanne M. Harris

Joanne’s Loki, as you would expect from a writer of her calibre, is an interesting and easy read. I can’t tell you how many books I’ve started and abandoned recently, but I read Loki straight through.

So it’s a good read. If you’ve never heard of Loki, or even if you have, but don’t know the myths about him, then this is highly recommended.

'The Name of the Wind' by Patrick Rothfuss

“The Waystone was his, just as the third silence was his. This was appropriate, as it was the greatest silence of the three, wrapping the others inside itself. It was deep and wide as autumn’s ending. It was heavy as a great river-smooth stone. It was the patient, cut-flower sound of a man who is waiting to die.”

The Name of the Wind, first in the Kingkiller Chronicles, was one of those books I'd seen around, figured I'd probably enjoy and so fully intended to put it on my 'to read' list at some point, but had no particular plans to read any time soon. However, then my Taller Half got hold of it and would not stop badgering me until I agreed to bump it to the top of the list. This in itself is a fairly good endorsement of the book since Taller Half isn't anywhere near the same sort of reader as me. He likes books well enough but he is considerably more picky than me about what he enjoys in a story and he has never, in the six plus years we've been together, spoken about a book the way he did about The Name of the Wind.

'The Name of the Wind' by Patrick Rothfuss

“The Waystone was his, just as the third silence was his. This was appropriate, as it was the greatest silence of the three, wrapping the others inside itself. It was deep and wide as autumn’s ending. It was heavy as a great river-smooth stone. It was the patient, cut-flower sound of a man who is waiting to die.”

The Name of the Wind, first in the Kingkiller Chronicles, was one of those books I'd seen around, figured I'd probably enjoy and so fully intended to put it on my 'to read' list at some point, but had no particular plans to read any time soon. However, then my Taller Half got hold of it and would not stop badgering me until I agreed to bump it to the top of the list. This in itself is a fairly good endorsement of the book since Taller Half isn't anywhere near the same sort of reader as me. He likes books well enough but he is considerably more picky than me about what he enjoys in a story and he has never, in the six plus years we've been together, spoken about a book the way he did about The Name of the Wind.

‘The Female Man’ by Joanna Russ

I had never heard of Joanna Russ until I picked up this book in the library. Here’s some info extracted from her Wikipedia entry (I have edited a bit):

‘The Female Man’ by Joanna Russ

I had never heard of Joanna Russ until I picked up this book in the library. Here’s some info extracted from her Wikipedia entry (I have edited a bit):

'Hawthorn and Child' by Keith Ridgway

This is a weird one for me to write. Partly, it’s weird writing this because I gave up reading it halfway through, which almost never happens. Because of its rarity, it’s also noteworthy, and this is why I feel I ought to write this review.

Pages