Other Writers

Book Reviews, Author Interviews and more

Q&A with Joanne Harris

First of all, we must thank Joanne for agreeing to this insanity.

Joanne Harris is the acclaimed writer of Chocolat. The sequel is called The Lollipop Shoes and she has just submitted Peaches For Monsieur Le Curé, the third novel featuring some of the same characters from both and which is due for publication at the end of May 2012.

Pages

'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman

It has been several years since I first read Neverwhere. I’d been meaning to re-read it for a while, and a few days ago, I did just that.

'Neverwhere' by Neil Gaiman

It has been several years since I first read Neverwhere. I’d been meaning to re-read it for a while, and a few days ago, I did just that.

'The Sparrow' by Mary Doria Russell

It isn’t often I read science fiction. It’s not generally my ‘thing’. But when theCactus handed me The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell and told me I’d love it, I was intrigued enough to give it a go.

I’m so glad I did. I was hooked before I’d even finished the first chapter. Who was Father Emilio Sandoz? Why was he the only one who had come back alive from Rakhat? And what had happened to his hands?

'The Sparrow' by Mary Doria Russell

It isn’t often I read science fiction. It’s not generally my ‘thing’. But when theCactus handed me The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell and told me I’d love it, I was intrigued enough to give it a go.

I’m so glad I did. I was hooked before I’d even finished the first chapter. Who was Father Emilio Sandoz? Why was he the only one who had come back alive from Rakhat? And what had happened to his hands?

'The Dosadi Experiment' by Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert, of course, is most famous as the writer of Dune and its original sequels - which are not to be confused with the prequels later written by Brian Herbert (son of Frank) and Kevin J. Anderson (writer of X-Files and Star Wars novels, and some novels - which are generally considered a bit shit - based on ideas of his own).

'The Dosadi Experiment' by Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert, of course, is most famous as the writer of Dune and its original sequels - which are not to be confused with the prequels later written by Brian Herbert (son of Frank) and Kevin J. Anderson (writer of X-Files and Star Wars novels, and some novels - which are generally considered a bit shit - based on ideas of his own).

'Shantaram' by Gregory David Roberts

I've had this massive book (over 900 pages) sitting on my shelf for several years. It had been recommended to me by several people, in every case with an awestruck expression on their faces at just how good it is. But nobody wanted to explain why I should read it, except that it was utterly brilliant.

So I finally read the thing, and now I have to review it somehow. It's hard to know where to start other than with a little bit about the author. Though some of this may not be strictly true, here goes:

'Shantaram' by Gregory David Roberts

I've had this massive book (over 900 pages) sitting on my shelf for several years. It had been recommended to me by several people, in every case with an awestruck expression on their faces at just how good it is. But nobody wanted to explain why I should read it, except that it was utterly brilliant.

So I finally read the thing, and now I have to review it somehow. It's hard to know where to start other than with a little bit about the author. Though some of this may not be strictly true, here goes:

'The Woman Who Died A Lot' by Jasper Fforde

It is a great writer who can keep a series going for this long and still have potential for more. The Woman Who Died A Lot is the seventh in Jasper Fforde’s ingenious Thursday Next series, which I have been following ever since I caught Jasper on a booky programme some years back, when there were only two published (The Eyre Affair and Lost In A Good Book).

'The Woman Who Died A Lot' by Jasper Fforde

It is a great writer who can keep a series going for this long and still have potential for more. The Woman Who Died A Lot is the seventh in Jasper Fforde’s ingenious Thursday Next series, which I have been following ever since I caught Jasper on a booky programme some years back, when there were only two published (The Eyre Affair and Lost In A Good Book).

Pages