Other Writers

Book Reviews, Author Interviews and more

Q&A with Joanne Harris

First of all, we must thank Joanne for agreeing to this insanity.

Joanne Harris is the acclaimed writer of Chocolat. The sequel is called The Lollipop Shoes and she has just submitted Peaches For Monsieur Le Curé, the third novel featuring some of the same characters from both and which is due for publication at the end of May 2012.

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'The Heretic Land' by Tim Lebbon

I read a fair amount of fantasy when I was younger. From the first time I borrowed an audiobook of The Hobbit from the library, I was always keen to be transported to places that could only exist in the mind. The wild countries with their strange creatures, arcane religions and hints of magic; these were the things that kept me up late at night, immersed in my latest book.

'The Heretic Land' by Tim Lebbon

I read a fair amount of fantasy when I was younger. From the first time I borrowed an audiobook of The Hobbit from the library, I was always keen to be transported to places that could only exist in the mind. The wild countries with their strange creatures, arcane religions and hints of magic; these were the things that kept me up late at night, immersed in my latest book.

'Things Fall Apart' by Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian novelist, poet, professor, and critic. He is best known for his first novel, Things Fall Apart (1958), which is the most widely read book in modern African literature.

'Things Fall Apart' by Chinua Achebe

Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian novelist, poet, professor, and critic. He is best known for his first novel, Things Fall Apart (1958), which is the most widely read book in modern African literature.

'The Apocalypse Codex' by Charles Stross

The Apocalypse Codex is the fourth book in Stross's 'Laundry' series of novels. The other novels in the series are: The Atrocity Archives (2004), The Jennifer Morgue (2006), and The Fuller Memorandum (2010). I haven't read any of those, and indeed this is the first book I've read by Stross, who has a fine reputation as a prolific writer of smart, fast-paced 'hard' SF sprinkled with geeky humour. He has won both Locus and Hugo Awards, and been nominated for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and the (Japanese) Seiun award. He also has an excellent blog, Charlie's Diary. (Do check it out; it's great.) In the world of contemporary SF, Charles Stross is one of the big names.

'The Apocalypse Codex' by Charles Stross

The Apocalypse Codex is the fourth book in Stross's 'Laundry' series of novels. The other novels in the series are: The Atrocity Archives (2004), The Jennifer Morgue (2006), and The Fuller Memorandum (2010). I haven't read any of those, and indeed this is the first book I've read by Stross, who has a fine reputation as a prolific writer of smart, fast-paced 'hard' SF sprinkled with geeky humour. He has won both Locus and Hugo Awards, and been nominated for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, the Arthur C. Clarke Award, and the (Japanese) Seiun award. He also has an excellent blog, Charlie's Diary. (Do check it out; it's great.) In the world of contemporary SF, Charles Stross is one of the big names.

'America Pacifica' by Anna North

Anna North’s debut novel America Pacifica is a book that straddles genre and resists attempts at categorization. It’s a dystopian novel set on an island off the west coast of the now-frozen United States but I hesitate to call it science fiction. It’s much more a character portrait of Darcy Pern, 18 years old, struggling to stay afloat in a poverty-riddled society, and desperate to find her missing mother Sarah.

'America Pacifica' by Anna North

Anna North’s debut novel America Pacifica is a book that straddles genre and resists attempts at categorization. It’s a dystopian novel set on an island off the west coast of the now-frozen United States but I hesitate to call it science fiction. It’s much more a character portrait of Darcy Pern, 18 years old, struggling to stay afloat in a poverty-riddled society, and desperate to find her missing mother Sarah.

'Life of Pi' by Yann Martel

I had heard good stuff about Yann Martel’s Life of Pi, but wasn’t sure it was really my thing. It won the Man Booker Prize in 2002, the year after it was published, and that’s not the sort of thing that usually gets me reading a particular book. So, it won an award. Big deal. It has to grab me, draw me in, often by its title alone, and something made me not read it for a long time. But I picked up this edition as part of World Book Night in 2011, and it had been sitting on my shelf ever since.

'Life of Pi' by Yann Martel

I had heard good stuff about Yann Martel’s Life of Pi, but wasn’t sure it was really my thing. It won the Man Booker Prize in 2002, the year after it was published, and that’s not the sort of thing that usually gets me reading a particular book. So, it won an award. Big deal. It has to grab me, draw me in, often by its title alone, and something made me not read it for a long time. But I picked up this edition as part of World Book Night in 2011, and it had been sitting on my shelf ever since.

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